How to use DVD Photo Slideshow to make photo DVD playable on TV?

If you are like most people these days, you've got thousands of digital photos stored on your PC and Flash cards. Wouldn't it be nice if you could easily create a cool slide show and view it on your TV with family and friends? Yep, Steve, it would!

DVD Photo Slideshow from Socusoft does this and more. Using this simple tool you can create multiple photo album collections, add transitions between your photos, add background music, and burn CDs (for PCs) or a variety of DVD formats (for TVs).

After you launch DVD Photo Slideshow you create a new album and import your photos. Thumbnails will be displayed allowing you to drag and drop the order of your photos or fine-tune their appearance further.

Next, you select your background music (a nice sample track is included) and what kind of transitions you want between photos. These are top notch and there are dozens to choose from.

Next, you select your graphical theme, many of which use some nice animation. You can add opening and closing credits, too.

Your final step with DVD Photo Slideshow is to burn your DVD. Here you can choose any technical settings you prefer and burn away. This is a very easy to use tool and one of the most full-featured we have come across in some time. To learn more, click here .

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VCD, DVD and Photo VCD

Video CD, or VCD, is a digital movie format. It's basically a primitive version of DVD. A Video CD is a kind of CD. It looks the same as a music CD or a CD-ROM, except that instead of music or software, it holds movies, using compressed MPEG-1 video. Its resolution is 352x240 (NTSC) or 352x288 (PAL), which is roughly comparable to VHS. VCD uses an MPEG-1 encoding standard to store the video and audio. A VCD can be played on almost all standalone DVD Players and on all computers with a DVD-ROM or CD-ROM drive with the help of a VCD decoder software. VCD 2.0 was introduced in 1995 and adds hi-resolution stills, fast-forward, and rewind functions to the original specifications; SuperVCD (SVCD) uses either high bit rate MPEG-1 or variable bit rate MPEG-2 for the use of CD-R drives instead of DVD drives.

DVD once stood for digital video disc or digital versatile disc, but now it just stands for DVD -- the next generation of optical disc storage technology. DVD is essentially a bigger, faster CD that can hold cinema-like video, better-than-CD audio, and computer data.

Photo VCD is not a standard by itself, this term is used when a group of image files are placed on a VCD connected to TV and displayed in a format like a slideshow. There are two ways of doing this with VCD 2.0 technology: one is to import the pictures into a video editing program, adding optional music and transition effects as desired. The time between pictures is decided by the filmmaker, not the viewer. The result is output as a VCD or SVCD motion video file and authored like any motion video to VCD or SVCD. The resolution is limited to VCD 352x240 (NTSC), 352x288 (PAL) or SVCD 480x480 (NTSC), 480x576 (PA)L which may appear grainy or low resolution compared to the original pictures. Another way is to author a photo VCD 2.0 disc encoding each picture as a still MPEG at 704x480 (NTSC), 704x576 (PAL). This allows better resolution but (probably) lacks transition effects. The resulting collection of still MPEG images can be authored with a program that automates the whole process from images to disc.

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